Crown Princess Passenger Alleges Spa Masseuse Caused Knee Injury

Crown Princess Passenger Alleges Spa Masseuse Caused Knee Injury
Crown Princess Passenger Alleges Spa Masseuse Caused Knee Injury

Crown Princess 7-Night Southern CaribbeanCrown Princess Passenger Alleges Spa Masseuse Caused Knee Injury – Linda Hanna, from Colorado, filed a lawsuit on February 28, 2019 against Princess Cruises and Steiner Leisure Limited, after she was injured during a Lotus Spa massage on March 1, 2018.

On March 1, Crown Princess had just called at Kralendijk, Bonaire the day before as the final port call and was sailing back to Fort Lauderdale, Florida at the end of a 7-night Southern Caribbean cruise.

Hanna alleges she went to the spa on the Crown Princess for a massage. Hanna further, alleges, that “During the massage, the masseuse flexed her hip and twisted her knee aggressively bending it against her chest. The day after the massage,  her knee started swelling. By the last day of the cruise, she was limping. As result of the improper massage, the Plaintiff suffered severe and permanent injuries, requiring surgical treatment.”

Following the massage and while she was onboard the Crown Princess, Plaintiff returned to the spa on three (3) separate occasions to complain about the massage to the spa manager. As a result of the improper massage, the Plaintiff was diagnosed with a torn medial and lateral meniscus, requiring surgery to her right knee (see video below).

Crown Princess embarked from Fort Lauderdale, Florida on Saturday, February 23, 2018, for an 7-night Southern Caribbean cruise with calls at  Willemstad,  Curaçao;  Oranjestad, Aruba and Kralendijk, Bonaire before returning to Fort Lauderdale.

Meniscus Tear Knee Injury

According to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, “A meniscus tear can occur when the knee is suddenly twisted while the foot is planted on the ground. A tear can also develop slowly as the meniscus loses resiliency. In this case, a portion may break off, leaving frayed edges”.

Meniscus tear is treated in one of three ways “A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is often used to diagnose meniscal injuries. The meniscus shows up as black on the MRI. Any tears appear as white lines. An MRI is 70 to 90 percent accurate in identifying whether the meniscus has been torn and how badly.

However, meniscus tears do not always appear on MRIs. Meniscus tears, indicated by MRI, are classified in three grades. Grades 1 and 2 are not considered serious. They may not even be apparent with an arthroscopic examination. Grade 3 is a true meniscus tear and an arthroscope is close to 100 percent accurate in diagnosing this tear(see video below).

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Video: Meniscus Injuries | Q&A with Dr. Andrew Cosgarea

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