Volcano Sulfur Dioxide Threatens Hawaiian Islands

Volcano Sulfur Dioxide Threatens All Hawaiian Islands
Volcano Sulfur Dioxide Threatens All Hawaiian Islands
NASA Visible Earth Hawaii Volcanic Plumes Vog
NASA Visible Earth Hawaii Volcanic Plumes Vog

(see video below) -} According to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), “The steady lowering of the lava lake in “Overlook crater” within Halemaʻumaʻu at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano has raised the potential for explosive eruptions in the coming weeks. If the lava column drops to the level of groundwater beneath Kīlauea Caldera, influx of water into the conduit could cause steam-driven explosions. Debris expelled during such explosions could impact the area surrounding Halemaʻumaʻu and the Kīlauea summit. At this time, we cannot say with certainty that explosive activity will occur, how large the explosions could be, or how long such explosive activity could continue.  Residents of the Kīlauea summit area should learn about the hazards of ashfall, stay informed of the status of the volcano and area closures, and review family and business emergency plans.”

USGS says, Gas emitted during steam-drive explosions will be mainly steam, but will include some sulfur dioxide (SO2) as well. Currently, SO2 emissions remain elevated. Steam-driven explosions at volcanoes typically provide very little warning. Once the lava level reaches the groundwater elevation, onset of continuous ashy plumes or a sequence of violent steam-driven explosions may be the first sign that activity of concern has commenced.”

There are 14 lava-and-gas producing fissures in Leilani Estates. Nearby, Hilo lies 25 miles northeast of Kilauea and the village of Pahoa is about 24 miles east.

Vog has become a huge worry. Vog, is short for volcanic smog. Vog is a fairly common weather phenomena in Hawaii,  and a National Weather Service forecast from Wednesday said that because of a wind shift, vog from the Big Island will begin to head north toward the other islands by Friday. “The southeasterly flow of air may be enough to allow pollutants, including low levels of  sulfur dioxide from the erupting Kilauea vents, to spread northwestward across the smaller islands  including Maui, Lanai, Molokai and perhaps Oahu, according to AccuWeather.

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Video: Rare Footage of Lava Entering the Ocean in Hawaii

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