Cruise Ship Pacific Aria Stowaway Flew The Coop

Cruise Ship Pacific Aria Stowaway Flew The Coop
Cruise Ship Pacific Aria Stowaway Harri
Cruise Ship Pacific Aria Stowaway Harri

Michelle and Brett Cozzi, along with their four-year-old daughter Georgia from Australia were planning a cruise last month aboard P&O Cruises Sea Princess. The family owned a Galah bird (see videos below) named Harri who apparently didn’t want to be left home.

Days before their cruise the bird flew the coop, making her getaway to Portside Wharf Cruise Ship Terminal in Hamilton, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Once at the cruise ship terminal, Harri boarded the next cruise to New Zealand aboard P&O Cruises Pacific Aria. But,  it was wrong the cruise ship, not the ship the family had  booked.

Pacific Aria found the stowaway on board the vessel as it approached Milford, New Zealand last week and alerted New Zealand authorities.

Hamilton Brisbane Queensland Australia
Hamilton Brisbane Queensland Australia

Managing to capture the bird and contain her to her own cabin, staff were allowed to keep Harri on board so long as they adhered to strict biosecurity guidelines. The cruise ship Quarantine officer was able to examine the bird, it was determined that the bird was healthy and microchipped; her identity number matched Harri’s.

Crew members checked on Harri in her private quarters and were in communication with the family numerous times as Harri sailed the high seas on her free cruise, which had become the adventure of her lifetime.

The family are expected to be reunited with Harri after the Sea Princess returned to Brisbane.

Wiki – The Galah

The galah also known as the rose-breasted cockatoo, galah cockatoo, roseate cockatoo or pink and grey, is one of the most common and widespread cockatoos, and it can be found in open country in almost all parts of mainland Australia.

Galahs are found in all Australian states, and are absent only from the driest areas and the far north of Cape York Peninsula. It is still uncertain whether they are native to Tasmania, though they are locally common today, especially in urban areas.  They are common in some metropolitan areas, for example Adelaide, Perth and Melbourne, and common to abundant in open habitats which offer at least some scattered trees for shelter.

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Video: Harri the Galah Playlist (6 videos)

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