7.1 Earthquake Rocks Raboso Mexico

7.1 Earthquake 5km ENE of Raboso Mexico
7.1 Earthquake 5km ENE of Raboso Mexico
7.1 Earthquake Rocks Raboso Mexico
7.1 Earthquake Rocks Raboso Mexico

09-19- 2017 at  18:14:39 UTC – Location: 18.584°N   98.399°W (see video below)

UPDATE September 20, 2017: ABC News is reporting that “200 people are dead. Among the dead are at least 22 people, including students and at least two adults, from a collapsed primary school in the south of the city. Pena Nieto visited the school late Tuesday. He said the 22 bodies have been recovered but that 30 children and eight adults are still missing.”

The September 19, 2017, M 7.1 earthquake in Central Mexico occurred as the result of normal faulting at a depth of approximately 50 km.

Focal mechanism solutions indicate that the earthquake occurred on a moderately dipping fault, striking either to the southeast, or to the northwest.

The event is near, but not directly on, the plate boundary between the Cocos and North America plates in the region.

7.1 Earthquake Rocks Raboso Mexico Estimated Fatalities
7.1 Earthquake Rocks Raboso Mexico Estimated Fatalities

FELT:

  • Raboso, Mexico 4.5 km (2.8 mi) ENE – Population: 4,374
  • Izúcar de Matamoros, Mexico 7.2 km (4.5 mi) ESE – Population: 42,936
  • Atencingo, Mexico 23.6 km (14.7 mi) ENE – Population: 12,910
  • Atlixco, Mexico 36.1 km (22.4 mi) S – Population: 85,891
  • Puebla, Mexico 55.0 km (34.1 mi) SSW – Population: 1,590,256

History:

Mexico has a long history of destructive earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. In September 1985, a magnitude 8.0 earthquake killed more than 9,500 people in Mexico City. In southern Mexico, Volcán de Colima and El Chichón erupted in 2005 and 1982, respectively. Paricutín volcano, west of Mexico City, began venting smoke in a cornfield in 1943; a decade later this new volcano had grown to a height of 424 meters. Popocatépetl and Ixtaccíhuatl volcanos (“smoking mountain” and “white lady”, respectively), southeast of Mexico City, occasionally vent gas that can be clearly seen from the City, a reminder that volcanic activity is ongoing. In 1994 and 2000 Popocatépetl renewed its activity forcing the evacuation of nearby towns, causing seismologists and government officials to be concerned about the effect a large-scale eruption might have on the heavily populated region. Popocatépetl volcano last erupted in 2010.

Video: Mexico 7.1 Earthquake: ‘Absolutely Horrific Images’

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